The Dog Ate My Care Plan…

Just a mom/wife/nursing student extraordinaire trying to make it in the big bad city…

Cabbage Anyone?

Posted by isntshelovlei on February 27, 2011

http://blog.silive.com/northshore/2008/07/large_07-31-nz-cabbage.jpgAs if there weren’t enough lingo, medical jargon, and unapproved abbreviations…enters “cabbage.” The first time I heard the expression was in Nursing Research. It really didn’t register at first as I usually tune 3/4 of that three-hour lecture out anyway (don’t even get me started on that class). The second time was probably in post conference (we’re in the CICU this rotation). “Patient had a ‘cabbage’ times two…” This time my antenna went up—patient had a what?!? But there’s a silent rule among nursing students in post conference—short, sweet answers only and don’t ask a lot of questions so we can get the hell out of there. If you really need to talk or ask the clinical instructor something stay afterwards and do it on your own time. So I kept my puzzlement to myself for the time being, “just smile and nod” as they say. It wasn’t until I was catching up on my reading for the week (we just so happened to be doing cardiac) that I had an epiphany.

Come to find out, “cabbage” is “short” for CABG, or coronary artery bypass graft. Well color me unimpressed. It’s not even a true acronym. CABG is actually an initialism; those four letters do not in fact form a word just because someone decided to pronounce them like one. 

I’ll get off my English lesson soapbox now…

But next thing you know we’ll be calling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) “Alice” or saying patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) have “Camel”—I wonder with one hump or two?…

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3 Responses to “Cabbage Anyone?”

  1. nurseXY said

    Haha, the first time you give report on a CABG patient, you’ll appreciate not having to say coronary artery bypass graft that many times.

  2. That was a good one! 🙂 There are lots of those kind of “abbreviated terms” that we don’t think twice about in nursing. Wait until you get to L&D! 😉

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